First Sentence Friday!

Years ago, my husband to be and I went on a hike in Doughton Park.  If you click on the link you’ll see a list of trails for the some thirty miles one can wander through, and never get lost.  (see what I did there?)  In our day backpacks we had bags of trail mix, some beef jerky, and water.  Based on what we’d mapped out, it would be around 15 miles total. As a sort of reward that would come about 2/3’s of the way through, we tied a couple bottles of “Yoohoo” together and set them down in a slower moving section of Basin Creek running alongside Basin Creek trail.  The stream was chilly enough to keep them cool until we made it back to that point, and we’d certainly need the energy because the last bit was mostly uphill.

While writing BITTERSWEET I often thought about the cabin we hiked to that day, called the Caudill Cabin.  It’s one of the only surviving structures still standing after the historic 1916 flood in the Basin Cove area.  The top collection of photos are only a few of the ones we took on that hike.  You can see what I mean about the vistas (from the first post last week) in the top two.  That’s Basin Creek in the lower left hand corner where our yummy Yoohoo drinks were chilling, and that is the Caudill cabin in the lower right hand corner.  If you look close, you can just see me sitting in the doorway.  The purple ball cap gives me away – barely.  You can get a perspective of how steep the hill is where the cabin was built, as it was my husband who took the picture (the one with me in it), and he’s not standing all that far away.

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Below are two photos that put the cabin and surrounding area into perspective.  (courtesy of the Caudill Cabin website)

 

See that little clearing in the trees?  That’s where it is.  Look around.  There’s nothing.  It’s very REMOTE, even today.  Imagine living here.  Imagine having to grow and kill everything you needed in order to eat.  Imagine the cold during winter.  I read that the closest town was called Absher, eight miles away.  There are/were NO ROADS to the cabin.  You had to hike in then, and you have to hike in today.  It’s mind boggling to know that a husband, wife and fourteen (!!!) children lived in this tiny structure, only leaving after the devastating flood of 1916 wiped out everything around them.  What a testament in fortitude, perseverance and courage.

Which is everything my story is about.

CHAPTER TWO

Laci fell asleep immediately while I listened to the rain hit the hand-split oak shingles over our heads.

A Publishers Lunch BUZZ BOOK Fall/Winter 2017, and a SIBA (Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance) Trio Pick for 2018, THE ROAD TO BITTERSWEET releases December 26th, 2017.  

***I’m using #FirstSentenceFridays on Twitter and tagging @Kensington Publishing Corporation.  Follow along and tweet out/share if you’d like!***

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